This web page presents information about the work of the IMF in Cyprus, including the activities of the IMF Resident Representative Office. Additional information can be found on the Cyprus and IMF country page, including IMF reports and Executive Board documents that deal with Cyprus.

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At a Glance: Cyprus and the IMF

  • Current IMF membership: 189 countries
  • Member since December 21, 1961
  • Quota: SDR158.20 million 
  • Each member country of the IMF is assigned a quota, based broadly on its relative position in the world economy. A member country's quota determines its maximum financial commitment to the IMF, its voting power, and has a bearing on its access to IMF financing.
  • Cyprus is represented in the Executive Board 
  • The Executive Board is responsible for conducting the day-to-day business of the IMF. It is composed of 24 Directors, who are appointed or elected by member countries or by groups of countries. The Managing Director serves as its Chairman. The Board usually meets several times each week. It carries out its work largely on the basis of papers prepared by IMF management and staff.

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News and Highlights

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Cyprus and the IMF

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Latest on Europe

Regional Economic Issues: Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe

Effective Government for Stronger Growth

November 2016

Economic growth remains solid in much of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe (CESEE). Outside the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), growth has continued at a good pace on the back of accommodative macroeconomic policies as well as buoyant consumption supported by strong real wage and employment growth. In Russia, the pace of economic contraction has moderated, as the economy appears to have adjusted to lower oil prices and the sanctions shock. Other CIS economies are gradually exiting from recessions on improved external demand. For the region as a whole, GDP growth is projected to reach 1.3 percent in 2016 and 2.1 percent in 2017, largely reflecting the improved outlook in the CIS.

Read the report