Changing Patterns of Global Trade


Date: June 15, 2011
 
Electronic Access: Full Text

 
Summary:The past few decades have seen important shifts that have reshaped the global trade landscape. As a share of global output, trade is now at almost three times the level in the early 1950s, in large part driven by the integration of rapidly growing emerging market economies (EMEs). The expansion in trade is mostly accounted for by growth in noncommodity exports, especially of high-technology products such as computers and electronics. It is also characterized by a growing role of global supply chains and an ongoing shift of technology content toward EMEs. These developments in global trade have been associated with growing trade interconnectedness and carry important implications for trade patterns, in particular in response to relative price changes. The aim of this paper is to outline the factors underlying these changes and analyze their implications for the outlook for global trade patterns.

 
Series : Policy Paper
Subject(s): International trade | United States | Japan | China | Euro Area | Export markets | Trade integration | Exports | Supply elasticity | Demand elasticity | Export prices | Export growth