For more information, see Burkina Faso and the IMF

Burkina Faso
Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility
Policy Framework Paper for 1998-2000

Tables

Table 1. Burkina Faso—Summary and Timetable of Macroeconomic
and Structural Adjustment Measures, 1998–2000

Objectives by sector

Measures

Dates

A. Government finance

 

 

1. Enhance the efficiency of the tax system

(a) Implement the common external tariff (WAEMU):

1998–2000

 

– Adopt new categorization for products.

January 1, 1999

 

– Reduce maximum rate to 20 percent.

January 1, 2000

 

– Reduce statistical tax to 1 percent.

January 1, 2000

 

(b) Implement measures to expand the taxable base:

 

 

– Introduction of withholding at source at customs and on purchases from wholesalers, to be applied against profit taxes

December 1998

 

 

– Implement withholding tax

July 1999

 

– Perform comprehensive review of tax and customs duty exemptions

March 1999

 

– Abolish exemptions in respect of indirect tax and taxes on international trade under the investment code

May 1999

 

(c) Improve tax and customs administration

 

 

– Complete the computerization of the DGI, particularly with regard to registration and integrated management of taxes

1998–99

 

– Strengthen the operational capacity of the unit in charge of prevention of smuggling and evasion.

1998

 

– Complete the computerization of six additional customs offices.

December 1998

 

– Computerize the processing of the merchandise-shipping documents.

 

– Establish a customs value database and establish an imported merchandise valuation unit.

1998–99

 

– Introduce a system for reconciling value verification statements (SGS) and customs declarations.

December 1998

2. Limit government expenditure and gradually modify the composition thereof, favoring priority sectors such as health, education, and infrastructure maintenance

(a) Maintain current expenditure at an average of about 10.5 percent of GDP during 1998-2000

1998–2000

 

(b) Prepare a medium-term expenditure framework, to be revised annually, focusing on:
(i) public investment program; and
(ii) operating expenditure, which must be consistent with objectives in the area of social indicators and infrastructure.

1998–2000

3. Enhance the effectiveness of the government’s financial management and budget preparation and monitoring

(a) Complete the computerization of the departments of the Ministry of Finance, with priority to be given to the investment expenditure control unit and payroll management.

December 1998

 

(b) Harmonize budget nomenclature within the WAEMU context.

1998–99

 

 

 

B. Institutional development, modernization of government, and civil service reform

 

 

1. Reform of government

(a) Pilot ministry MFPDI (civil service)
Implement a new organization chart based on the organizational audit already performed, and on job descriptions for staff and departments.

December 1998

 

(b) Introduce new organizational charts based on the following:
(i) organizational audit.
(ii) strategic policy memorandum.
(iii) job descriptions for staff and departments, focusing on MEF (finance), MS (health), MCIA (commerce) ministries.

1998-99

 

(c) Establishment of performance indicators, activity reports, services, and of procedures for performance monitoring.

1998-99

 

(d) Initiate hiring of contractual personnel at the MEBA (primary education) and MS ministries.

1999

 

(e) Placing of personnel in the new salary grid.

December 1998

 

(f) Implement new legal provisions pertaining to permanent and contractual government personnel, including introduction of a merit-based promotion system.

1999

2. Modernize personnel management

(a) Introduce a human resources department in each ministry.

December 1998

 

(b) Implement a human resources management training program for human resource managers.

1998–99

 

(c) Prepare a national plan for good governance.

1998–99

 

(d) Set up a government personnel database using a single reference file for MFPDI and MEF.

December 1998

 

(e) Limit personnel changes to those actions required to fill (i) vacant posts, and (ii) new posts whose creation was duly authorized by the Minister of the Civil Service, the Minister of Finance, and the Minister of the employing ministry in the context of budget programming.

1998–2000

3. Decentralization

(a) Define the legislative, institutional, and socioeconomic framework for decentralization.

December 1998

 

(b) Evaluate financial impact of the decentralization process and the necessary supporting instruments.

1998–1999

 

(c) Design and implement the decentralization process, encompassing a program to transfer skills and resources (human, financial, and physical) to decentralized local governments.

1998–2000

 

 

 

C. Public investment

 

 

1. Improve the preparation of budgets for capital expenditure

(a) Prepare every year a sliding three-year public investment program.

1998–2000

 

(b) Preparation of a test program budget for 1999 for 6 ministries.

September 1998

 

(c) Submit three-year public investment program in the form of a program law for the social sectors (program authorization and annual payment appropriations) to the National Assembly in the context of the budget laws, beginning with the budget for FY 2000; generalization of program budget if the tests are satisfactory.

1999–2000

2. Enhance the productivity of public investment and improve project execution

(a) Reorganize the units responsible for designing, implementing, and monitoring the PIP, in line with the recommendations of the ongoing study.

March 1999

 

(b) Review the rules governing project analysis and selection in line with the recommendations of the ongoing study.

March 1999

3. Improve the monitoring of project execution and coordinate external aid

(a) On a semiannual basis, reconcile data on payment appropriations with data on actual disbursements.

From Dec. 1998

 

(b) Strengthen the accounting and financial management of projects.

1998–2000

 

(c) Conduct annual analysis of project portfolios by sector.

1998–2000

 

 

 

D. External sector

 

 

1. Strengthen external debt management

(a) Contract no new government or government guaranteed external borrowing on nonconcessional terms (35 percent grant element).

1998–2000

 

(b) Conclude rescheduling arrangements with creditors outside the Paris Club.

1998–99

 

(c) Reconcile annually loan disbursement data with foreign lenders.

1998-2000

E. Financial sector

 

 

1. Continue improving the banking system

(a) Disseminate and enforce the uniform acts of the OHADA, particularly as regards collateral.

1998–2000

 

(b) Continue implementation of the recommendations of the Banking Commission (liquidity and effective capital and reserves).

1998–2000

 

(c) Evaluate portfolio of the BRCB (credit recovery unit).

March 1999

2. Strengthen nonbank financial intermediation

(a) Onlending of proceeds of 1997 government bond issue to savings and loans associations.

1998–99

 

(b) Strengthen the unit responsible for enforcement of the PARMEC law within the Ministry of Finance.

1998–99

 

(c) Complete the restructuring of the CCP/CNEs.

1999

 

(d) Finalize the compensation of credits between the government and SONAPOST.

December 1998

 

(e) Make operational the Advisory Committee on Insurance in the context of implementing the CIMA code for insurance.

December 1998

 

 

 

F. Public enterprises

 

 

1. Improve the financial situation of the sector, increase its contribution to economic growth, and reduce the burden it places on public finance

(a) Periodically adjust the rate schedules of SONABEL, SONAPOST, and ONEA to reflect changes in their costs.

1998–2000

 

(b) Complete the second phase of privatization initiated in November 1994:

 

 

– Launch invitations to bid for the sale of SLM, SOCOGIB, INB, SNTB.

End-September 1998

 

– Judicial liquidation of SOFIVAR.

By end-1998

 

– Close out liquidation of ONAVET, COMIKI, FASO-YAAR, CSPPA, SINAC.

December 1998

 

– Complete the sale or liquidation of SAVANA.

December 1998

 

– Complete sale, or liquidation of FASO FANI.

March 1999

 

– Complete the liquidation or privatization of SONACOR.

December 1998

 

– Transfer to BRCB the liquidation of SOBEMA and SONACAB.

August 1998

 

– Finalize the merger of CNEA with APICOMA.

December 1998

 

(c) Launch call for bids for Société des Hôtels de la Gare.

December 1998

 

(d) Introduced a strengthened system for monitoring the performance of enterprises remaining in the government’s portfolio.

December 1998

 

(e) Carry out the strategic study for the remaining state companies’ portfolio, and define related strategy.

April 1999

2. Restructure the telecommunications sector

(a) Adopt regulatory framework for the telecommunications sector, including liberalization of the sector, in particular for services involving substantial value added.

December 1998

 

(b) Put up for sale the government’s equity holdings in ONATEL, except for a minority shareholdings.

1999

 

(c) Grant cellular telephone licenses.

1999

3. Transportation sector

(a) Adopt the privatization strategy for Air Burkina.

December 1998

 

(b) Implement the strategy.

1999

 

 

 

G. Private sector promotion

 

 

1. Create an environment conducive to development of the private sector

(a) Implement restructuring of Chamber of Commerce (CCIA), Office National du Commerce (ONAC), and transport association (CBC).

1998–2000

 

(b) Finalize delegation of power for the staff of the Ministry of Justice and MEF in the Business Promotion Center (CPE).

October 1998

 

(c) Make operational of the National Competition and Consumer Commission (CNCC).

December 1999

 

(d) Continue simplifying formalities for trade, investment, and new enterprises.

1998–2000

 

(e) Introduce coordinated economic and business information services.

1998–2000

 

(f) Assist in the implementation of quality management systems within businesses and supporting institutions.

1998–2000

 

(g) Improve system of coordination between government and private sector.

December 1998

2. Strengthen the judiciary

(a) Implement OHADA uniform acts and adopt accordingly national legislation.

1998–2000

 

(b) Establish commercial courts.

1998–2000

 

(c) Promote training of magistrate and auxiliary personnel.

1998-2000

 

 

 

H. Poverty reduction

 

 

1. Reduce the numbers of people living in absolute poverty

(a) Formulate a national poverty reduction program, with measures to encompass all sectors of government activity.

1998-99

 

(b) Establish quantitative goals in terms of poverty reduction, as well as tracking indicators.

1998–99

 

(c) Organize multi-year planning of household surveys and polls.

1998–99

 

(d) Improve financial intermediation in rural areas.

1998–2000

 

(e) Facilitate small farmers’ access to improved technologies, inputs, and markets.

1998–2000

 

(f) Undertake analysis of the impact of government spending in social sectors every other year.

Beginning in 1998

 

 

 

I. Economic and social advancement of women, focusing on educational, legal, economic, structural, and social obstacles facing women

(a) Prepare an orientation law concerning social action and family protection


1999

 

(b) Pursue the implementation of the national plan for promoting the education of girls.

1998–2000

 

(c) Promote legal education through IEC campaigns and the establishment of legal advisory centers aimed at disseminating information on the family code.

1998–2000

 

(d) Target agricultural research and extension programs to the needs of rural women rural.

1998–2000

 

(e) Promote the access of women to remunerative work.

1998–2000

 

 

 

J. Population and the development of human resources—Health

 

 

1. Improve the quality of primary health care services; reduce inequalities between urban and rural areas, as well as between men and women, in terms of access to primary health care; extend the coverage of and rate of use of family planning services

(a) Increase the annual health budget by 10 percent per year, so as to bring to 12 percent the share of the 1999 government budget devoted to health spending, in conformity with WHO norms.

1998–99

 

(b) Set up a decentralized financial management system at the health district level.

1998–99

 

(c) Reallocate the health budget to the decentralized health districts, which should receive at least 50 percent of the allocations of goods and services.

1998–99

 

(d) Ensure full operation of the 768 existing health centers (CSPS). By the year 2000, all CSPS should meet minimum standards (three staff).

1998–99

 

(e) Prepare a plan to decentralize health care personnel at the health district level.

1998-2000

 

(f) Decentralize the recruitment of health personnel, with a system of regionalization of positions.

1999-2000

 

(g) Increase efforts to raise the rate of attendance at health centers (CSPS).

1998–99

 

(h) Maintain a system for the provision of essential generic drugs which prevents interruptions in supplies at the health centers (CSPS).

1998–2000

 

(i) Increase the immunization rate (currently between 50 percent and 70 percent depending on the antigen) to 75-85 percent in 1999/2000.

1998–2000

 

(j) Continue extending family planning services:

1998–2000

 

– Establish such services in 100 additional CSPS units per year.

 

 

– Promote community-based distribution of contraceptives.

 

 

(k) Improve the collection and dissemination of health statistics and establish methods that permit a better evaluation of the utilization rate.

1998-2000

 

(l) Preparation of a national health development plan.

1999

2. Prevent the spread of AIDS

(a) Based on the CAP survey, strengthen and extend the coverage of information and education campaigns on AIDS, without discrimination on the basis of sex.

1998–2000

 

 

 

K. Population and development of human resources—Education

 

 

1. Increase educational coverage; reduce the inequalities in educational opportunities between girls and boys, and regional disparities; improve the quality of basic education; and increase adult literacy rate, especially among women

(a) Increase the share of expenditure devoted to basic education in total government spending from 9.4 percent in 1997 to about 13 percent in 1999.

1998–99

 

(b) Broaden access to primary school;

 

 

–  increase the gross enrollment ratio from 40 percent in 1997 to 48 percent in 1999/2000;

1998–2000

 

–  increase the enrollment ratio for girls from 30.5 percent in 1996 to 40 percent in the year 1999/2000;

1998–2000

 

–  increase the new entrants in the first year of primary school from 154,000 in 1996 (34 percent enrollment rate) to about 269,000 in the year 1999/2000 (59 percent enrollment rate).

1998–2000

 

(c) Teaching innovations to reduce the impact of the classroom shortage:

1998–2000

 

– Increase the proportion of double shift classes (CDF) in urban areas and multigrade classes (CMG) in rural areas.

1998-99

 

– Increase the proportion of multigrade classes (CMG) and double-shift classes (CDF) in proportion to total classes from 17 percent in 1996 to 33 percent in 1999.

1998–99

 

(d) Improve the quality of primary education

 

 

– Reduce the proportion of students repeating primary grades from 18 percent in 1996 to 14 percent in the year 1999/2000.

1998–2000

 

– Increase the availability of textbooks to reach the level of at least one book for every two students in French and mathematics by the year 1999/2000.

1998–2000

 

– Improve working conditions of teachers and students.

1998-2000

 

(e) Adopt measures reflecting the priorities on girls at the post-primary level.

1998–99

 

(f) Adopt and implement a strategy for using contractual teachers at the local community level within the context of decentralization.

1998–2000

 

– Finalization of document.

August 1998

 

– Pilot phase and continuing evaluation.

1998-99

 

– Adjustment and extension of strategic plan.

1999–2000

 

 

 

L. Employment and vocational training

 

 

1. Promote long-term employment and enhance capacity for worker and employers training and retraining

(a) Set up a monitoring center for employment and vocational training.

1999–2000

 

(b) Perform a basic survey of the informal sector and prepare a strategy to support this sector.

1998–99

 

(c) Strengthen and implement structures to enhance vocational training and promote employment.

1998–2000

 

 

 

M. Agriculture

 

 

1. Enhance the effectiveness of public and private institutions serving agriculture

(a) Continue implementing the plan to reorganize agricultural services

 

 

– Complete the liquidation of the assets and liabilities of the CRPAs.

December 1998

 

– Complete redeployment of the personnel.

December 1998

 

(b) Prepare a regulatory framework to facilitate the promotion and operation of grass-roots farmers’ organizations and trade associations.

December 1998

2. Improve the incentive framework for domestic and foreign agricultural trade

(a) Rice subsector:

 

 

– Gradual withdrawal of the public sector from rice imports and rice trade

1998–99

 

(b) Sugar subsector:

 

 

– Align the reference price for imported sugar with the level resulting from decisions adopted within the WAEMU

1999–2000

 

(c) Cotton subsector:

 

 

– Sign the interprofessional agreement on cotton (SOFITEX/cotton producers).

December 1998

 

– Implement the action plan for opening up the capital of SOFITEX to cotton producers and other sector’s operators, initially up to a 30 percent share.

1998–99

 

– Facilitate the establishment of private operators in new cotton-producing regions, pursuant to appropriate terms of reference to be specified

1998–99

3. Enhance the effectiveness of government spending in the agricultural sector

Adopt and implement an action plan aimed at improving the procedures for programming and monitoring government expenditure in the agricultural sector, based on the review of the PIP.

1998–2000

4. Lay the groundwork for sustainable growth of the agricultural sector

(a) Draw up a strategic plan for agricultural sector growth, based on the strategic policy document already adopted

December 1998

 

(b) Prepare action plans focusing on the subsectors

1998-99

 

 

 

N. Livestock

 

 

1. Establish an incentive framework to promote the stock rearing sector

(a) Evaluate the Special Contribution of the livestock sector (CSSE) to determine its impact on the economy in general and on livestock sector activities in particular.

December 1998

 

(b) Draft a pasture land code and the associated regulations.

April 1999

 

(c) Prepare a national scheme for development of pasture.

December 1998

2. Improve the yields of the national livestock population

(a) Prepare and implement a national livestock feeding plant.

1998–99

 

(b) Improve traditional stock rearing through species intensification.

1998–2000

 

 

 

O. Environment and management of natural resources

 

 

1. Support the environmental management measures

(a) Review and expand the coverage of the environmental action plan.

1998–99

 

(b) Prepare and adopt the implementing regulations for the various environmental laws, specifically, the environment code and the forestry code.

November 1998

 

(c) Implement the convention on the control of desertification, based on the preparation of a national plan.

1998–2000

 

(d) Implement the convention on biodiversity, based on the preparation of a national plan.

1998–2000

 

(e) Implement convention on climatic change, based on the preparation of a national plan.

1998–2000

2. Improve the management of natural resources

(a) Extend and accelerate community-level management of land.

1998–99

 

(b) Harmonize the provisions recently adopted on brush fires with existing forestry legislation.

December 1998

 

(c) Establish regulations to govern the operation of the unit in charge of the participatory management of water resources.

1999

 

(d) Extend the collective programs of forestry management.

1998–99

 

 

 

P. Water

 

 

1. Water. Strengthen the institutions in the water sector to enable them to manage water resources more effectively and to ensure their financial viability


(a) Complete study on reform of the system for managing water pumping facilities and infrastructure in rural and semi-urban areas.


1998–99

 

(b) Implement management of water resources through watersheds.

1998–2000

 

(c) Implement revised technical assistance program for ONEA.

November 1998

 

(d) Strengthen the operational efficiency, financial viability, and autonomy of ONEA.

1998–2000

 

(e) Introduce the practice of having ONEA out source certain activities (installation of new connections, maintenance and repairs to the water distribution network).

October 1998

2. Meet potable water requirements on a sustainable basis

(a) Upgrade the system providing information on the potable water supply.

1998–2000

 

(b) Increase potable water coverage.

1998–2000

 

 

 

Q. Urban development

 

 

 

(a) Define the strategic framework for decentralization:

Clarify and delineate the responsibilities of urban municipalities [communes].

December 1998

 

(b) Adopt accompanying measures in respect of municipal development:

 

 

1. Finance municipal infrastructure and services by making maximum use of the fee-for-service principle and matching the financial resources of municipalities with their responsibilities.

1998–2000

 

2. Adjust the residence tax to prevent it from being eroded over time.

1998–2000

 

3. Periodic revaluation of local resources.

 

 

(c) Strengthen the private sector’s role in land development and housing.

1998–2000

 

(d) Develop the mortgage market and strengthen land conservation services.

1998–2000

 

 

 

R. Energy

 

 

Electricity

 

 

1. Streamline the operation of the sector, increase competition, and reduce costs

(a) Formulate a medium-term strategy to generate electric power through the preparation of a plan for expansion on a least-cost basis.

1999

 

(b) Prepare a national electrification plan.

1998–99

 

(c) Adopt legislation for giving the private sector a role in electric power generation.

December 1998

2. Streamline the operation of the traditional energy sector and ensure a viable supply of firewood to urban areas

(a) Design and implement a development strategy for the traditional energy sector.

1998–99

 

(b) Implement integrated operations for management of national resources and traditional energy.

1998–2000

Oil and gas

 

 

1 Simplify the sector’s operations, increase competition, and reduce costs, with incentives for suitable operators

(a) Continue periodic adjustment of prices of petroleum products on the basis of costs.

1998–2000

 

(b) Rationalize the distribution of roles among the various participants, ensuring that SONABHY implements the energy policy defined by the government.

1999

 

(c) Design and implement measures aimed at liberalizing the oil and gas market and reducing costs.

1998–2000

 

 

 

S. Mining industry

 

 

1. Promote the development of the mining sector

(a) Mining code

 

 

– Adopt all implementing decrees for the 1997 Mining Code.

March 1999

 

(b) Gold exports

 

 

– Facilitate the establishment of private-sector operators for the purchase and exporting of gold.

January 1999

 

(c) Claims

 

 

– Maintain conditions which encourage ore prospecting at the cost of US$25-30 million per year.

1998–2000

 

– Improve the monitoring and management of mining claims.

1998-2000

 

(d) Public entities

 

 

– Continue the ban on the holding of mining claims by government entities.

1998–2000

 

(e) Taxation

 

 

– Simplify customs procedures in respect of inputs related to exploration activity

1998–2000

 

– Improve the collection of surface fees on mining claims

1998–2000

 

(f) Environment

 

 

– Heighten awareness of the environmental problems associated with artisanal mining operations

1998–2000

 

 

 

T. Transport

 

 

1. Ensure road maintenance at a reasonable cost and rationalize new investments in the sector

1. Road sector

(a) Gradually expand the network of maintained roads from 9,000 kilometers to 12,000 kilometers. For this purpose, increase road maintenance appropriations commensurately (a minimum of CFAF 5 billion per year at 1997 prices).

1998–2000

 

(b) Ensure that government expenditure in the transport sector is allocated for road maintenance on a priority basis.

1998–2000

2. Improve transport services and ensure the financial viability of enterprises in the sector

2. Transportation sector

(a) Create a tripartite structure, private sector/government/local authorities responsible for coordinating urban transport.

1999

 

(b) Prepare an action plan for road security.

1998–99

 

(c) Prepare an action plan to reduce urban pollution caused by motorized transport.

1998–99

 

3. Civil aviation sector

 

 

(a) Privatization of airport management.

end-1999

 

(b) Liberalize supply of assistance at airports.

1998–99

 

4. Railroad sector

 

 

(a) Consolidate concession agreements

1998–99

5. Develop tourism potential

(a) Prepare strategic scheme

1998-99

 

(b) Develop access to touristic sites

1998-2000

 

(c) Train personnel

1998-2000

 

 

 

U. Statistics

 

 

1. Improve the statistics on the national accounts, government finance, and balance of payments

(a) Implement national strategy for statistical information, encompassing the design of a core statistics program as well as the associated institution-building measures.

1998–99

 

(b) Gradually extend the coverage of the consumer price index to include markets outside Ouagadougou.

1998–99

 

(c) Preparation of national accounts, 1994–96.

June 1999

 

(d) Revise index of industrial production.

1998–99

 

(e) Analyze and publish the results of the general population and habitation census.

June 1999

 

(f) Completion of priority survey II on households, and publication of the results

June 1999

 

(g) Improve preparation of international trade statistics.

1998–2000

 

(h) Improve the system for managing public debt data, with the SYGADE software.

1998–99

 


 

Table 2. Burkina Faso: Selected Economic and Financial Indicators, 1994-2000

1994

1995

1996


1997


1998


1999


2000


 

 

Est.

Prog.

Est.

Prog.

Rev.
Prog.

Prog.

Proj.

(Annual percentage changes, unless otherwise specified)

GDP and prices

  GDP at constant prices

1.2

4.0

6.0

6.6

5.5

6.1

6.2

5.7

5.6

  GDP deflator

27.8

9.8

4.2

3.1

2.0

2.1

2.0

2.2

2.6

  Consumer prices (annual average)

24.7

7.8

6.1

3.0

2.3

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.5

  Consumer prices (end of period)

29.1

3.9

6.9

3.0

-0.1

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.5

Money and credit

  Net domestic assets (banking system) 1/

6.6

-5.8

8.5

5.0

21.4

3.5

5.1

4.5

...

  Credit to the government 1/

8.5

-6.2

3.8

-0.6

8.3

-0.6

-1.1

0.8

...

  Credit to the private sector 1/

-8.3

3.4

11.0

5.6

15.5

4.9

7.1

4.4

...

  Broad money (M2)

29.9

23.7

8.2

7.0

14.1

8.4

10.4

9.2

...

  Velocity (GDP/M2)

4.2

4.0

4.0

4.1

3.8

3.8

3.7

3.7

...

External sector

  Exports (f.o.b.; valued in CFA francs)

40.1

13.2

0.1

29.1

23.6

15.6

31.4

15.7

10.8

  Imports (f.o.b.; valued in CFA francs)

26.7

24.9

18.3

8.5

10.9

8.0

10.2

9.1

7.2

  Volume of exports

-29.8

5.4

2.5

15.4

18.3

23.1

37.3

12.0

6.0

  Volume of imports

-29.9

24.4

12.9

-1.8

5.8

7.9

16.6

8.1

6.0

  Terms of trade

10.6

7.4

-6.8

1.3

-0.4

-5.6

1.9

2.4

3.4

  Real effective exchange rate (depreciation -)

-38.8

7.7

3.0

...

-2.8

...

...

...

...

(In percent of GDP, unless otherwise specified)

Gross investment

19.3

22.5

24.8

24.9

25.4

26.4

25.5

25.3

25.3

  Government

7.0

9.3

10.9

11.5

12.5

13.0

12.5

12.3

11.9

  Private sector

12.3

13.2

13.9

13.4

12.9

13.5

12.9

13.0

13.5

  Gross domestic savings

6.1

7.2

7.5

9.3

9.2

10.2

11.2

11.7

12.3

  Government savings

2.5

3.7

4.8

5.9

6.0

6.7

5.8

5.4

5.0

  Private savings

3.6

3.4

2.7

3.4

3.2

3.5

5.4

6.3

7.3

  Gross national savings

17.4

16.8

14.8

15.2

15.3

14.8

15.8

16.3

17.1

Central government finances

  Revenue

11.0

11.6

12.3

12.9

13.0

13.9

13.0

12.5

12.0

  Domestic primary expenditure and net lending

11.9

10.6

10.7

11.0

11.9

12.5

12.2

12.0

11.8

  Overall fiscal balance 2/

-11.0

-9.4

-9.0

-8.2

-10.1

-11.6

-10.3

-10.1

-9.9

  Primary balance (deficit -) 3/

-0.9

1.0

1.7

1.9

1.1

1.4

0.8

0.5

0.2

  Current primary balance 3/

0.0

1.9

3.0

4.0

3.9

4.2

3.5

3.2

2.9

External sector

  Exports of goods and nonfactor services

13.2

13.0

12.2

13.2

13.8

14.1

16.1

16.8

17.0

  Imports of goods and nonfactor services

26.3

28.3

29.5

28.8

30.1

30.3

30.4

30.5

30.0

  Current account balance (excluding official transfers)

-8.7

-11.3

-13.4

-11.5

-12.6

-12.8

-10.9

-10.2

-9.5

  Current account balance (including current official transfers)

-1.8

-5.7

-10.0

-9.6

-10.2

-11.6

-9.7

-9.1

-8.2

  Debt-service ratio 4/

24.7

22.9

18.3

15.8

15.2

14.4

12.6

11.9

12.1

  Debt-service ratio 5/

29.5

25.6

18.2

16.2

16.2

14.6

15.5

16.0

17.0

  Net official reserves (in months of imports)

11.2

12.5

10.7

9.2

10.0

6.6

9.8

9.7

9.9

  Nominal stock of public debt

...

54.3

51.9

...

54.7

...

53.7

52.5

51.0

  Net Present Value of Public External Debt 6/

...

318.4

237.5

...

228.4

...

221.8

207.7

191.8

Nominal GDP (in billions of CFA francs)

1,029

1,176

1,298

1,427

1,398

1,515

1,515

1,637

1,773

Sources: Data provided by the Burkinabè authorities; and Fund staff estimates and projections.
1/ In percent of beginning-of-period broad money.
2/ Commitment basis, excluding grants.
3/ Commitment basis, excluding grants and foreign-financed projects.
4/ In percent of exports of goods and nonfactor services; excluding IMF.
5/ Ratio of public external debt service to government revenue, excluding grants.
6/ Ratio to three year average of exports of goods and services.

 


 

Table 3. Burkina Faso: External Financing Requirements and Resources, 1994-2000

(In billions of CFA francs)

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998


1999


2000


1998-2000


Prog.

Prog.

Prog.

Average

Requirements

192.5

243.4

196.0

184.5

214.4

219.4

232.6

222.1

  Current account deficit,

    excluding official transfers

89.3

132.8

173.8

176.1

164.4

167.2

168.4

166.7

  Debt amortization 1/

20.9

24.4

18.4

20.7

21.3

22.5

25.5

23.1

  IMF repurchases

0.0

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.7

3.1

5.9

3.6

  Arrears (increase-)

17.3

1.4

0.2

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

  Change in net foreign

    assets (increase+) 2/

64.8

84.9

3.1

-13.3

26.9

26.7

32.8

28.8

Resources

192.5

243.4

196.0

184.5

214.4

219.4

232.6

222.1

  Official transfers (current and capital)

105.8

113.3

126.4

115.2

115.0

119.7

124.9

119.8

  Long-term public loan

    disbursement (gross)

57.8

69.6

49.7

49.3

62.1

61.0

66.0

63.0

    Of which: World Bank 3/

28.8

21.6

0.0

0.0

12.0

6.0

6.0

8.0

  Private capital (net)

7.3

42.4

13.8

6.5

8.3

8.9

6.9

8.0

  Debt rescheduling

7.7

4.6

1.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

  Debt under discussion 4/

...

...

...

2.8

2.8

2.8

2.8

2.8

  Use of IMF resources

13.9

13.5

4.9

10.6

10.7

10.5

10.5

10.6

    SAF

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

    ESAF

13.9

13.5

4.9

10.6

10.7

10.5

10.5

10.6

  Exceptional financing 5/

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

15.5

16.6

21.5

17.9

Memorandum item:

  CFA francs per SDR (average)

782.9

757.2

743.4

802.0

807.3

794.0

791.2

797.5

Sources: Burkinabè authorities; and staff estimates and projections.

1/ Scheduled debt service, before debt relief.
2/ Excluding use of Fund resources (net).
3/ Adjustment loans.
4/ Debt in negotiation with non-Paris Club creditors.
5/ Adjustment loans and grants.

 


 

Table 4. Burkina Faso: Income and Social Indicators

Item

Unit of Measure

Latest single year


Estimate


Est.


Programmed


1970-75

1980-85

1990-95

1996

1997

1998

1999

Population

Population (midyear)

thousands

6,202.0

7,881.0

10,377.0

10,688.3

11,009.

11,339.2

11,679.4

Population growth rate

annual average in %

2.1

2.6

2.9

3.0

3.0

3.0

3.0

Total fertility rate

births per woman

7.0

7.5

6.7

6.7

...

...

...

Poverty

National poverty line

local currency

...

...

...

41,099

...

...

...

Urban poverty line

local currency

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Rural poverty line

local currency

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

National headcount index

% of population

...

...

...

45.0

...

...

...

Urban headcound index 2/

% of population

...

...

...

7.8

...

...

...

Rural headcount index

% of population

...

...

...

...

...

...

Income/consumption

GNP per capita 1/

US$

150.0

180.0

230.0

220.0

218.0

...

...

Index of real wages

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Agricultural

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Nonagricultural

Consumer price index

annual average %

18.6

7.4

7.9

6.1

2.3

2.5

2.5

Food price index

annual average %

...

2.7

11.8

...

...

...

...

Income/consumption distribution

Share of income or consumption

Lowest quintile

% of income

...

...

...

5.0

...

...

...

Highest quintile

% of income

...

...

...

65.0

...

...

...

Gini coefficient

0.63

Social Indicators

Share of public expenditure

% of GDP

Health

...

...

1.5

2.6

2.3

2.4

...

Education

1.8

1.9

2.2

2.3

...

Social security and welfare

Gross primary school enrollment rate

Total

% of school age group

16.0

29.0

38.0

40.0

42.3

45.0

48.0

Male

% of school age group

12.0

21.0

30.0

...

...

...

...

Female

% of school age group

21.0

36.0

47.0

30.5

33.0

35.5

40.0

Access to safe water

Total

% of population

25.0

35.0

...

7.8

...

...

...

Urban

% of population

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Rural

% of population

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Immunization (under 12 months)

Measles

% of age group

...

38.0

55.0

57.0

70.0

75.0

80.0

DPT

% of age group

...

2.0

47.0

50.0

60.0

70.0

75.0

Child (under 5) malnutrition rate

% of age group

...

...

...

3.3

...

...

...

Life expectancy at birth (years)

Total

years

41.1

44.9

48.7

49.9

51.2

52.4

53.7

Male

years

39.7

43.6

45.2

...

...

...

...

Female

years

42.6

46.2

47.2

...

...

...

...

Infant mortality rate

per 1,000 live births

137.0

117.0

99.4

98

...

...

...

Under-5 mortality rate

per 1,000 live births

...

...

164.0

158

...

...

...

Male

per 1,000 live births

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Female

per 1,000 live births

...

...

...

...

...

...

...

Adult (15-59) mortality rate

per 1,000 population %

24.6

19.9

18.1

...

...

...

...

Births assisted

%

...

...

32.9

3.3

...

...

...

Maternal mortality rate

per 100,000 live births

...

600.0

939.0

93.0

...

...

...

1/ World Bank Atlas method.
2/ Ouagadougou and Bobo-Dioulasso.
Sources: Social Indicators of Development, 1996 Edition; and World Bank staff estimates.


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