Migration and Human Capital Formation: Theory and Evidence from the U.S. High School Movement

 
Author/Editor: Ramcharan, Rodney
 
Publication Date: July 01, 2002
 
Electronic Access: Free Full text (PDF file size is 1,336KB).
Use the free Adobe Acrobat Reader to view this PDF file

 
Disclaimer: This Working Paper should not be reported as representing the views of the IMF. The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to further debate
 
Summary: In 1910, 12 percent of American 14-17 year olds were enrolled in high school; by 1930, enrollment had increased to 50 percent; enrollment in Britain was 12 percent in 1950. This paper argues that by increasing the skill premium, the massive inflows of European unskilled immigrants at the turn of the twentieth century engendered America's sharp rise in human capital investment. The increased enrollments raised the supply of schools, leading to continued schooling investment. Cross section evidence and a VAR analysis of the time series data support the hypothesized role of immigration in generating the high school movement.
 
Series: Working Paper No. 02/123
Subject(s): Migration | United States | Human capital | Education | Investment | Economic models

Author's Keyword(s): Factor movements | human capital formation
 
English
Publication Date: July 01, 2002
ISBN/ISSN: 1934-7073 Format: Paper
Stock No: WPIEA1232002 Pages: 39
Price:
US$15.00 (Academic Rate:
US$15.00 )
 
Price Delivery Note: Prepayment required for individual copies. An annual subscription is $375.00 a year. It includes 12 monthly shipments and priority mail delivery. The Stock No. for the subscription is WPEA.
 
Please address any questions about this title to publications@imf.org