Has Globalization Really Increased Business Cycle Synchronization?

Author/Editor:

Eric Monnet ; Damien Puy

Publication Date:

March 8, 2016

Electronic Access:

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Disclaimer: This Working Paper should not be reported as representing the views of the IMF.The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to further debate

Summary:

This paper assesses the strength of business cycle synchronization between 1950 and 2014 in a sample of 21 countries using a new quarterly dataset based on IMF archival data. Contrary to the common wisdom, we find that the globalization period is not associated with more output synchronization at the global level. The world business cycle was as strong during Bretton Woods (1950-1971) than during the Globalization period (1984-2006). Although globalization did not affect the average level of co-movement, trade and financial integration strongly affect the way countries co-move with the rest of the world. We find that financial integration de-synchronizes national outputs from the world cycle, although the magnitude of this effect depends crucially on the type of shocks hitting the world economy. This de-synchronizing effect has offset the synchronizing impact of other forces, such as increased trade integration.

Series:

Working Paper No. 16/54

Subject:

English

Publication Date:

March 8, 2016

ISBN/ISSN:

9781513564890/1018-5941

Stock No:

WPIEA2016054

Price:

$18.00 (Academic Rate:$18.00)

Format:

Paper

Pages:

55

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