Does an Inclusive Citizenship Law Promote Economic Development?

Author/Editor:

Patrick A. Imam ; Kangni R Kpodar

Publication Date:

January 11, 2019

Electronic Access:

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Disclaimer: IMF Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to encourage debate. The views expressed in IMF Working Papers are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the views of the IMF, its Executive Board, or IMF management.

Summary:

This paper analyzes the impact of citizenship laws on economic development. We first document the evolution of citizenship laws around the world, highlighting the main features of jus soli, jus sanguinis as well as mixed regimes, and shedding light on the channels through which they could have differentiated impact on economic development. We then compile a data set of citizenship laws around the world. Using cross-country regressions, panel-data techniques, as well as the synthetic control method and subjecting the results to a battery of tests, we find robust evidence that jus soli laws—being more inclusive—lead to higher income levels than alternative citizenship rules in developing countries, though to a less extent in countries with stronger institutional environment.

Series:

Working Paper No. 19/3

English

Publication Date:

January 11, 2019

ISBN/ISSN:

9781484383070/1018-5941

Stock No:

WPIEA2019003

Price:

$18.00 (Academic Rate:$18.00)

Format:

Paper

Pages:

39

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