Financial Repression is Knocking at the Door, Again

Author/Editor:

Etibar Jafarov ; Rodolfo Maino ; Marco Pani

Publication Date:

September 30, 2019

Electronic Access:

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Disclaimer: IMF Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to encourage debate. The views expressed in IMF Working Papers are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the views of the IMF, its Executive Board, or IMF management.

Summary:

Financial repression (legal restrictions on interest rates, credit allocation, capital movements, and other financial operations) was widely used in the past but was largely abandoned in the liberalization wave of the 1990s, as widespread support for interventionist policies gave way to a renewed conception of government as an impartial referee. Financial repression has come back on the agenda with the surge in public debt in the wake of the Global Financial Crisis, and some countries have reintroduced administrative ceilings on interest rates. By distorting market incentives and signals, financial repression induces losses from inefficiency and rent-seeking that are not easily quantified. This study attempts to assess some of these losses by estimating the impact of financial repression on growth using an updated index of interest rate controls covering 90 countries over 45 years. The results suggest that financial repression poses a significant drag on growth, which could amount to 0.4-0.7 percentage points.

Series:

Working Paper No. 19/211

Subject:

English

Publication Date:

September 30, 2019

ISBN/ISSN:

9781513512488/1018-5941

Stock No:

WPIEA2019211

Price:

$18.00 (Academic Rate:$18.00)

Format:

Paper

Pages:

66

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