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United Republic of Tanzania: Request For a 40- Month Arrangement Under The Extended Credit Facility —Press Release; Staff Report; And Statement By The Executive Director For The United Republic Of Tanzania

August 5, 2022
Tanzania’s economy is gradually recovering from the negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. While IMF emergency financing (0.8 percent of GDP) in 2021 helped address fiscal pressures, preserve stability, and finance the authorities’ COVID-19 economic and health response, Tanzania continues to face development and reform challenges to unleash its economic potential. The authorities are seeking renewed Fund assistance to support the country facing protracted balance of payments needs associated with the two external shocks—the COVID-19 pandemic and the war in Ukraine—and to support the authorities’ reform agenda summarized in their Five-Year Development Plan.

Cameroon: Second Reviews Under The Extended Credit Facility And The Extended Fund Facility Arrangements, And Requests For Waivers For Performance Criteria Applicability And Modification Of Performance Criterion—Press Release; Staff Report; And Statement By The Executive Director For Cameroon

August 4, 2022
Following two years of COVID-19 challenges, Cameroon, the largest economy in the Central African Economic and Monetary Union (CEMAC), is facing a new policy environment. The nascent economic recovery from mid-2021, supported by higher oil prices and non-oil production, is now subject to greater uncertainties with spillovers from the war in Ukraine, high inflationary pressures, especially on food and fuel prices, and a tightening of global financial conditions. Low vaccination rates also leave the country vulnerable to further COVID-19 waves. In July 2021, the IMF’s Executive Board approved three-year arrangements under the Extended Credit Facility (ECF) and the Extended Fund Facility (EFF) for SDR 483 million (about US$689.5 million, or 175 percent of Cameroon’s quota) to support the country’s economic and financial reform program.

Blog: Global Current Account Balances Widen Amid War and Pandemic

August 4, 2022
The war in Ukraine and resulting increase in commodity prices are expected to contribute to a further widening this year.

External Sector Report 2022

August 4, 2022
Global current account balances—the overall size of current account deficits and surpluses—continued to widen in 2021 to 3.5 percent of world GDP, and are expected to widen again this year. The IMF’s multilateral approach suggests that global excess balances narrowed to 0.9 percent of world GDP in 2021 compared with 1.2 percent of world GDP in 2020. The pandemic has continued to affect economies’ current account balances unevenly through the travel and transportation sectors as well as a shift from services to goods consumption. Commodity prices recovered from the COVID-19 shock and started rising in 2021 with opposite effects on the external position of exporters and importers, a trend that the war in Ukraine is exacerbating in 2022. The medium-term outlook for global current account balances is a gradual narrowing as the impact of the pandemic fades away, commodity prices normalize, and fiscal consolidation in current account deficit economies progresses. However, this outlook is highly uncertain and subject to several risks. Policies to promote external rebalancing differ with positions and needs of individual economies.

Blog: How Europe Can Protect the Poor from Surging Energy Prices

August 3, 2022
With fossil fuels likely to remain expensive for some time, governments should let retail prices rise to promote energy conservation while protecting poorer households.

Germany: Financial Sector Assessment Program: Detailed Assessment Of Observance Of The CPSS-IOSCO Principles For Financial Market Infrastructures–Clearstream Banking AG Frankfurt

August 3, 2022
Clearstream Banking Frankfurt (CBF) is a highly interconnected financial market infrastructure that provides a critical service for German financial markets and beyond. CBF is the central securities depository (CSD) in Germany providing mainly custody and settlement services, having received its license pursuant to Art. 16 of the CSDR on January 21, 2020 allowing it to perform core CSD services as well as non-banking ancillary services. It is also the operator of two securities settlement systems (SSS). In addition, CBF was authorized on August 24, 2021 to provide banking-type ancillary services as envisaged under Art. 54 CSDR.

Republic of South Sudan: 2022 Article IV Consultation And Second Review Under The Staff-Monitored Program

August 3, 2022
South Sudan is a very fragile post-conflict state and one of the most vulnerable countries in the world to climate-driven disasters. The pandemic reversed the economic recovery that followed the 2018 peace agreement. The oil price shock from the pandemic resulted in a massive loss of revenue, causing the government to run up expenditure arrears and resume monetary financing. This led to sharp exchange rate depreciation and runaway inflation. The policies implemented under a Staff Monitored Program (SMP) that was approved in March 2021 and supported by two disbursements under the RCF (in November 2020 and March 2021) have helped restore macroeconomic stability and eliminate a long-standing system of multiple exchange rates. Higher oil prices have dampened the effects of floods on lower oil production and sustained international reserves in the face of a rising import bill. The sharp rise in global food prices risks is exacerbating the dire humanitarian situation in South Sudan, where 70 percent of the population suffers from acute food insecurity, at a time when aid budgets are being cut.

Germany: Financial Sector Assessment Program Technical Note—Macroprudential Policy Framework And Tools

August 3, 2022
Germany’s macroprudential policy framework and toolkit are well developed. The FSAP found the institutional arrangements for macroprudential policy to be mostly sound and operating well. Capacity and expertise in risk monitoring is good, thanks to the analytical power and data access of the central bank, and close coordination between the macro- and microprudential arms of the financial supervisory authorities. Germany’s macroprudential toolkit continues to develop. The principal outstanding task is to add powers to set caps on debt-to-income and debt service-to-income ratios on residential real estate loans to the already-established powers over loan-to-value ratios and amortization rates. These additions will place Germany’s toolkit on a par with its peers.

Germany: Financial Sector Assessment Program Technical Note—Insurance Regulation And Supervision

August 3, 2022
The Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) conducted a focused review of insurance regulation and supervision in Germany. This technical note (TN) provides an update on the insurance sector and highlights risks and vulnerabilities. It analyzes four key aspects of regulatory and supervisory oversight: supervisory powers, independence, and resources; the solvency framework; supervision; and changes of control and resolution.2 The Federal Financial Supervisory Authority (BaFin) is the federal German insurance supervisor. BaFin is subject to oversight by the Federal Ministry of Finance (MoF), which is accountable to the Federal Parliament. The analysis focuses on supervision within the scope of BaFin’s mandate. The TN comments on progress in respect of the implementation of recommendations made by the previous FSAP and offers further recommendations to strengthen the regulatory and supervisory regime.

Germany: Financial Sector Assessment Program Technical Note—Regulation And Supervision Of Less Significant Institutions

August 3, 2022
The Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) conducted a focused review that primarily assessed banking regulation and supervision of Germany’s less significant institutions (LSIs).1 Germany accounts for 1,324 of about 2,400 total LSIs in the Euro Area (representing 40 percent of Germany’s banking sector assets and approximately 55 per cent of total Euro Area LSI assets). As Germany is part of the Euro Area, the regulation and supervision of banks takes place within the European Central Bank’s (ECB) Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM). The Federal Financial Supervisory Authority (BaFin) and the Deutsche Bundesbank (BBk) are responsible, under the oversight of the ECB, for the supervision of LSIs.

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